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Bone,Location/Common name,Image,Ref,Fun Fact 1,Fun Fact 2,Fun Fact 3,Sources
Cranium or Neurocranium,Brainpan,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Neurocranium_-_animation02.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neurocranium,"In humans, this bony structure is usually considered to be comprised of eight separate bones; 1 ethmoid bone, 1 frontal bone, 1 occipital bone, 2 parietal bones, 1 sphenoid bone and 2 temporal bones.","Human infants are born with two fontanelles, or soft spots, in this structure, a membranous gap that allows stretching of this structure as the brain expands faster than the surrounding bone can grow; the anterior fontanelle (between the frontal & parietal bones) usually closes by about 18 months to 2 years of age, while the posterior fontanelle (between the parietal and occipital bones) closes during the first 2 or 3 months.","Some birds and other migratory animals have deposits of biological magnetite in their ethmoid bones (one of the eight bones with make up this structure) which allow them to sense the direction of the Earth's magnetic field; humans have a similar magnetite deposit, but it is believed to be vestigial.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Maxilla,Upper jaw,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Maxilla_animation.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxilla,This bone gets its name from a diminutive form of the Latin word for jaw.,"Fractures of this bone are classified using the Le Fort system, named after a French surgeon who discovered the fracture patterns.",The sinus in the body of this bone is the largest air sinus in the body.,"wikipedia.org, radiopaedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Mandible,Lower Jaw,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Mandible_animation.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandible,"This bone, the largest, strongest and lowest bone in the face, gets its name from the Latin for 'to chew.'",One-fifth of facial injuries involve a fracture of this bone.,"When human remains are found, this is soemtimes the only bone remaining, and experts can estimate the age of the person by this bone because it changes over a person's life.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Cervical Vertebrae,Backbone at the neck,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Cervical_vertebrae_animation_small.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cervical_vertebrae,"These are the vertebrae of the neck, located immediately below the skull; in humans, these are the smallest of the true vertebrae and distinguished by a foramen (hole) in each transverse process through which the vertebral artery passes.","These vertebrae are numbered C1 to C7, with C1 closest to the skull (at the base of the nose and hard palate) and C6-C7 near the cricoid cartilage (around the trachea and voice box).","In many species, though not in mammals, these vertebrae bear ribs.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Thoracic Vertebrae,Backbone at the ribcage,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Thoracic_vertebrae_animation.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thoracic_vertebrae,"These vertebrae form the middle segment of the vertebral column, and are numbered T1 - T12 with T1 closes to the skull and increasing in size as they go down.","In other animals, the number of these vertebrae can vary greatly; for instance marsupials generally have 13, horses, rhinoceroses end elephants generally have 18 - 20 and sloths can have as many as 25 while cetaceans such as whales and dolphins have only 9.","These vertebrae are distinguished by facets on the side that articulate with, or attach to, the ribs.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Lumbar Vertebrae,Backbone between ribs & pelvis,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Lumbar_vertebrae_animation.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lumbar_vertebrae,"These are the five vertebrae between the rib cage and pelvis, designated L1 to L5; the largest segmnets of the vertebral column, they support weight and permit movement.","African apes have three or four of these vertebrae, versus five in humans, and it is believed the last common ancestor had a long vertebral column in this region; the reduction in vertebrae in chimps and gorillas is assumed to have evolved independently in each ape clade, and results in a inability to curve their lower spine, in contrast to Old World monkeys.","Some people have an additional vertebrae in this region, called L6; while this doesn't lead typically lead to spinal problems, the last of these vertebrae, whether L5 or L6, is the most common site of some spinal cord problems, including spondolysis (a defect or stress fracture in the vertebral arch) and spondylolisthesis (forward displacement of the bone).","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Clavicle,Collarbone,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Clavicle_-_animation2.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clavicle,"This bone, also called the collarbone, serves as a strut between the shoulder blade and sternum; it can serve as a reliable criterion for sex determination as it larger and longer in males than females.","This is the first bone to begin the process of ossification (laying down of minerals onto a preformed matrix) during development of the embryo, during the fifth and sixth weeks of gestation; however, it is one of the last bones to finish ossification at about 21?25 years of age.",This is the most commonly fractured long bone in the human body.,"wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Scapula,Shoulder blade,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Scapula_-_animation.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scapula,"This bone, also called the shoulder blade, connects the humerus (upper arm bone) with the clavicle (collar bone).","The last sections of this bone ossify, or harden, between the 14th and 20th years.","Muscles that attach to this bone include the trapezius, deltoid, pectoralis minor, biceps and rhomboid.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Sternum,Breastbone,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Sternum_animation3.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sternum,"This bone, also called the breastbone, is a flat bone on the front of the chest that helps protect the the heart, lungs and blood vessels from injury; it consists of three parts: the manubrium, the body and the xiphoid process.","Improperly performed chest compressions during CPR can cause the lowermost part of this bone to snap off, causing injury to the diaphragm or liver.","This bone, whose name comes from the Greek word for chest, is not found at all in fish, turtles or snakes; it is relatively largei n birds, but only in mammals does it take on the elongated from seen in humans.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Ribs,Ribcage,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/ribcage.png?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rib,"Humans have 24 of these bones (12 pairs); the first 7 are called 'true' because they attach directly to the sternum, the following five are 'false' - three connect to the sternum indirectly via cartilage while the last two are 'floating', connected only to the vertebrae and not the sternum at all.","Frogs typcially have none of these bones, while snakes may have several hundred.","The spaces between these bones are known as intercostal spaces, and contain the intercostal muscles (which generally aid in breathing), intercostal nerves (innervating the thoracic wall, pleura and peritoneum), and intercostal arteries and veins.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org"
Innominate bone,Hip bone or pelvic bone,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Hip_bone_animation.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hip_bone#/search,"In some vertebrates, including humans prior to puberty, this bone is composed of three bones, the ilium, ischium and pubis; in human adults they are fused.","Muscles that attach to this bone include the abdominal muscles, back muscles, all the gluteal muscles, muscles of the lateral rotator group, hamstring muscles, two muscles from the anterior compartment of the thigh and even a single shoulder muscle.","This bone first appears in fishes, where it consists of a simple, usually triangular bone, to which the pelvic fin articulates. ","wikipedia.org, radiopaedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Sacrum,Base of the spine,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Sacrum_-_animation00.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacrum,This bone at the base of the spine forms by the fusing of the vertebrae S1 through S5 between 18 and 30 years of age.,"The name for this name comes from the Latin for sacred bone, which may refer to this being part of an animal offered in sacrifice, being thought to be the location of the soul or a mistranslation of the original Greek and should be 'strong' or 'big' instead of holy.","This bone is noticably sexually dimorphic, being shorter and wider in females, and with different curvature.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Coccyx,Tailbone,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Coccyx_-_animation05.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coccyx,"This bone is the final segment of the vertebral column in humans and apes, and certain other mammals such as horses; it comprises three to five separate or fused vertebrae. While often thought of as fully fused in adults, in face the most common configuration for this bone is two or three vertebral segments rather than full fusion.","The name for this bone comes from the ancient Greek for cuckoo, as it was thought to resemble the beak when viewed from the side.","In humans, this bone is the remnant of a vestigial tale; it is not entirely useless, however, as it is an important site of attachment for various muscles, tendons and ligaments, and helps support the weight of a sitting person.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Humerus,Upper arm,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Humerus_animation.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humerus,"The name of this bone is derived from the Latin for upper arm and shoulder, not the feeling you get when you strike the ulnar nerve at the distal end of this bone.",Tennis elbow is the common term for injury to the tendons that attach the forearm muscles to the lateral epicondyle of this bone; tennis eblow is also known as lateral epicondylitis.,"In dogs, a condition known as incomplete ossification of the humeral condyle can occur, in which the end of the humerous fail to fuse creating a fissure at the distal end; this is especially common in Spaniels.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan, wikivet.net"
Ulna,Lower arm opposite thumb,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Ulna_-_animation.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulna,"This bone has a bony projection, the olecranon process, a hook-like structure that fits into the humerous and prevents hyperextension of the elbow.",In many mammals this bone is fused with the radius and not a separate bone at all.,The name of this bone comes from the Latin for elbow.,"wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Radius,Lower arm thumb side of wrist,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Radius_-_animation2.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radius_(bone),,In four-legged animals this is the main load-bearing bone of the lower forelimb.,,"wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Carpals,Wrist,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Carpus_%28left_hand%29_-_animation01a.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carpal_bones,These are eight small bones that make up the wrist and facilitate effective positioning of the hand.,"Occasionally accessory bones are found along with these bones, that is bones that do not occur frequently but still occur in a significant number of people; there are at least four proven accessory bones sometimes found along with these.","These bones ossify in a specific order starting after birth, making them useful in forensic age estimation.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Metacarpals,Between wrist and fingers (palm),https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Metacarpal_bones_%28left_hand%29_-_animation01.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metacarpal_bones,"There are several congenital disorders associated with shortening of these bones, particularly the fourth or fifth, including Tuner syndrome (a missing X chromosome in females) and pseudohypoparathyroidism (resistance to the parathyroid hormone).","Various terms have colloquially been applied to fractures of these bones, including 'Boxer's fracture' and 'Bar Room fracture'.","In four-legged animals, these bones form part of the forefeet, and are frequently reduced in number, appropriate to the number of toes.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Phalanges (Hand),Fingers,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Phalanges_of_the_hand_%28left_hand%29_-_animation01.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phalanx_bone,"In primates, the thumbs have two of these bones, while the other digits have three; there are 56 of these bones total in the human body.","The name for this group of bones refers to an ancient Greek army formation in which soldiers stand side by side several rows deep, like an arrangement of fingers.","Most land mammals including humans have a 2-3-3-3-3 arrangement of these bones in the hand; primitive reptiles typically had the formula 2-3-4-4-5, while the flippers of cetaceans (marine mammals) have the formula 2-12-8-1.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Femur,"Upper leg, thighbone",https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Femur_-_animation9.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Femur,"This is the longest, and by most measures, the strongest bone in the body; on average its length is almost 27% of a person's height.",The name of this bone comes from the Latin for thigh.,"Some species of whales, snakes, and other non-walking vertebrates have vestigial bones of this type.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Patella,Kneecap,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/patella.jpg?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patella,This is the largest sesamoid bone in the human body (a bone embedded in a muscle or tendon).,This triangular bone doesn't begin to ossify until about three years of age.,"Dislocation of this bone occurs with significant regularity, particular in young female athletes.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org"
Tibia,"Lower leg, shinbone",https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Tibia_-_animation2.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tibia,This is the second largest bone in the human body next to the femur.,This bone has been modeled as taking an axial force during walking that is up to 4.7 times bodyweight.,"In Judaism, this bone of a goat or lamb is used in the Passover Seder plate, called Zeroa (or z'roa) and symbolizing the korban Pesach (Pesach sacrifice).","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Fibula,"Lower leg, calf bone",https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Fibula_-_animation.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibula,This is the slenderest of all the long bones in proportion to its length.,This bone of the leg does not carry any significant load or weight of the body.,"This bone is commonly used to reconstruct the mandible, for instance after a tumor of the jaw.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Tarsals,"Upper foot, ankle, heel",https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Tarsal_bones_-_animation01.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarsus_(skeleton),"These bones are a cluster of seven bones the foot; In humans the largest of these bones is the calcaneus, which is the weight-bearing bone within the heel of the foot","Of these bones, the talus bone, or ankle bone, connects to the tibia and fibula to form the ankle joint, while five irregular bones in the midfoot form the arches of the feet which serves as a shock absorber.","In birds, these bones have fused with either the tibia or the metatarslas to create a single tarsometatarsus bone, effectively ging the leg a third segment; in a remarkable case of parallel evolution, a tarsometatarsus was also present in a group of tiny ornithischian dinosaurs (Heterodontosauridae) that predate the first birds with a tarsometatarsus by nearly 100 million years.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Metatarsals,Between hind- and mid-foot and toes,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Left_Metatarsal_bones_-_animation02.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metatarsal_bones,These bones are frequently broken by soccer players.,"There are five of these bones in humans, one corresponding to each toe.","Turf toe' is a joint sprain injury to the connective tissue between these bones and the big toe caused by hyperextension; it got the name from being associated with playing sports on rigid surfaces like artificial turf, and is common in American football players.","wikipedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Phalanges (Feet),Toes,https://sites.google.com/a/wyzkidlabs.com/resources/images/skeletal-anatomy/Phalanges_of_the_foot_-_animation02a.gif?attredirects=0,https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phalanx_bone,"In primates, the big toes have two of these bones, while the other digits have three; there are 56 of these bones total in the human body.","The middle and distal of these bones are sometimes fused together on the fifth toe (in about 55% of the population), fourth toe (about 5%) and occassionaly third toe (about 1%).","The distal of these bones in ungulates (hoofed mammals) carry and shape nails and claws, and are referred to as unguals.","wikipedia.org, radiopaedia.org, wikimedia.org, animation by BodyParts3D/Anatomography CC-BY-SA 2.1 Japan"
Bone
[1] Cranium or Neurocranium
[2] Maxilla
[3] Mandible
[4] Cervical Vertebrae
[5] Thoracic Vertebrae
[6] Lumbar Vertebrae
[7] Clavicle
[8] Scapula
[9] Sternum
[10] Ribs
[11] Innominate bone
[12] Sacrum
[13] Coccyx
[14] Humerus
[15] Ulna
[16] Radius
[17] Carpals
[18] Metacarpals
[19] Phalanges (Hand)
[20] Femur
[21] Patella
[22] Tibia
[23] Fibula
[24] Tarsals
[25] Metatarsals
[26] Phalanges (Feet)
Human Skeleton
Cranium or Neurocranium
Maxilla
Mandible
Cervical Vertebrae
Thoracic Vertebrae
Lumbar Vertebrae
Clavicle
Scapula
Sternum
Ribs
Innominate bone
Sacrum
Coccyx
Humerus
Ulna
Radius
Carpals
Metacarpals
Phalanges (Hand)
Tibia
Patella
Tarsals
Fibula
Femur
Metatarsals
Phalanges (Feet)
Cranium or Neurocranium
Location/Common name: Brainpan
Maxilla
Location/Common name: Upper jaw
Mandible
Location/Common name: Lower Jaw
Cervical Vertebrae
Location/Common name: Backbone at the neck
Thoracic Vertebrae
Location/Common name: Backbone at the ribcage
Lumbar Vertebrae
Location/Common name: Backbone, ribs to pelvis
Clavicle
Location/Common name: Collarbone
Scapula
Location/Common name: Shoulder blade
Sternum
Location/Common name: Breastbone
Ribs
Location/Common name: Ribcage
Innominate bone
Location/Common name: Hip bone or pelvic bone
Sacrum
Location/Common name: Base of the spine
Coccyx
Location/Common name: Tailbone
Humerus
Location/Common name: Upper arm
Ulna
Location/Common name: Lower arm, opposite thumb
Radius
Location/Common name: Lower arm, thumb side
Carpals
Location/Common name: Wrist
Metacarpals
Location/Common name: Between wrist & fingers
Phalanges (Hand)
Location/Common name: Fingers
Femur
Location/Common name: Upper leg, thighbone
Patella
Location/Common name: Kneecap
Tibia
Location/Common name: Lower leg, shinbone
Fibula
Location/Common name: Lower leg, calf bone
Tarsals
Location/Common name: Upper foot, ankle, heel
Metatarsals
Location/Common name: Hind/mid-foot to toes
Phalanges (Feet)
Location/Common name: Toes
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